WordsWorking

Try PATY for customer retention

True story:

Went through the drive-through of a fast food restaurant. (Isn’t that how these stories always start?) While waiting at the window for my food – after getting a very pleasant greeting of “$9.71” (and literally no other words) from the restaurant’s employee – I noticed a sign on his side of the window. Actually, it was more of a scrawled message on a whiteboard, but I took it as a sign.

The message said, “Please and thank you go a long way.” YES! I thought that I’d finally found a fast-food restaurant (see above note) that had it right.

Alas, the employee returned – after a very long, lonely absence – and handed me my food. “Have a nice day” was all I got. Okay, so that’s polite and nice and all, but I seriously doubt it was anywhere close to sincere.

So, I had to ask. And I did, as pleasantly and in as good a humor as I could muster. “That sign behind you – is that for employees to read or just something nice for customers to see?” The employee was absolutely, positively dumbfounded. It was as if he was seeing that message for the very first time. I’m guessing that was the case, actually.

He asked me – and I am NOT making this up – “You want me to say please and thank you?”

GACK. Seriously? Yes, dear, I am your customer. I just handed you money. (Remember the “$9.71”?) You could say thank you.

That’s not really what I said in response, of course. My even smarter response was “Yes. It goes a long way,” as I again pointed to the sign.

The employee gave a bit of an embarrassed giggle but still did not get it. I said “thank you.” Twice. He said … wait for it … “you’re welcome.”

More GACK.

So I gestured. No, not that kind of gesture. I gave him a visual signal that I expected HIM to say “thank you.” And hooray! He did actually say it. Although, again, I seriously doubt it was anywhere close to sincere.

Please and thank you … they do go a long way … when they are actually used! They have magical powers. They can make customers happy, convince customers you honestly appreciate their business, and they can bring those customers back for more.

Try PATY (please and thank you) with your team. Let me know how it goes!

 

#humancomms #customercommunications #words

Need help training your employees to use PATY and other magical words when communicating with each other and with customers? Let’s talk!

Is your team electronically addicted?

Is your team addicted to their phones?

 

Technology is amazing. It enables us to communicate across towns, across states, across the world … across the table.

 

What? Across the table? Yes, just like teens sitting next to each other on the couch, grown business people are often glued to their cell phones when sitting across from each other at the conference table in a large meeting and even across the desk in a one-on-one discussion.

 

Your team can reconnect with each other and with your clients. It doesn’t require giving up the electronic devices completely. Those are certainly excellent tools – in the right place, at the right time.

 

Reconnecting is very simply a matter of remembering how to connect on a human level.

 

In a retail situation, for example, does your team member acknowledge the customer’s choice to spend money with your company by using the actual words “thank you”? For a service or online business, do you reach out to your clients on a human level, with a phone call or a handwritten note sent via the actual mail?

Think about the difference you can make to your client’s perception of your business with these extra little steps (that used to be, by the way, the normal course of business).

 

When you and your team make the effort to communicate on a human level – putting away the electronics at the table or at the cash register – your customers will notice and will appreciate it.

 

Need more info? Contact us!

Why am I the one saying “thank you”?

Now that we have (mostly) survived the holiday shopping season, let’s reflect on our experiences, shall we?

As a customer, did you feel appreciated when you chose to spend your money in certain stores?

As a business owner, did your team show appreciation to your customers?

Sure, there might have been exchanges of “have a nice day” or even “happy holidays,” but how many times did you hear or did you say … “thank you”?

How often were the words “there you go” uttered instead, when a receipt or shopping bag was handed over?

Is it easier to say “there you go” than “thank you”?

There you go … 3 syllables

Thank you … 2 syllables

Maybe my math is off, but doesn’t “thank you” take less effort? It certainly carries greater weight! Think about the warm fuzzy feeling you get when you hear those words. That’s the feeling your customers want too!

So why, when I say “thank you” to a cashier, do I get that proverbial deer-in-the-headlight look like I’m speaking a foreign language that they don’t understand?

And … why am I – the customer – the one saying “thank you”?

Here’s a fun little game. Go to a store. Purchase something. Wait for the cashier to say “there you go” while giving you a receipt. Look at the cashier. Say “thank you.” Watch what happens.

My guess is that the cashier will stumble through a confused “you’re welcome” and then move on to the next customer.

When did customer communication move into backward land? Why am I, the customer, thanking the business for allowing me to spend my money there? And when did “there you go” become an acceptable replacement for “thank you”?

Here’s a very doable resolution for businesses in 2018. Train your team to say the words “thank you.”

Seriously. 2 little syllables. They carry tremendous power in your customer communications.

Try it. Let me know how it works.

Thank you for reading.

Thank you!

Do you always thank your customers—every time?

The next time you interact with other businesses, whether stopping at a fast food restaurant, buying groceries, or shopping at a “big box” store, count the number of times you are actually thanked.

If conducting a transaction with a service business, whether in person or online, you should receive an equally enthusiastic “thank you for your business.” Do you?

These days, the trend seems to be for the store clerk or restaurant cashier to “thank” the customer by saying “here you go” when handing over the receipt. The words “thank you” are very rarely used. Although many will attempt a pleasantry with “have a nice day” or “have a good one,” those two little words we long to hear as customers are still missing.

Pay attention to what you and your team members are saying to your clients. In fact, take a few extra minutes to write a note of thanks and put it in the mail.

Surprise and please your clients—and set your business apart from those who don’t make that effort.

 

How FTD just lost $65 and a customer

First lesson: Capture a screenshot whenever you have a sketchy “customer service” experience online.

Second lesson: As a business owner, never let any of your employees do this to a potential customer.

The story: A few days ago, I decided to send an older family member some flowers for her birthday. The branding message in my head said to go to FTD.com because they specialize in flower delivery. It’s been a while since I’ve ordered flowers, though, so I was a little confused when most of the selections were going to be delivered “in a gift box” via UPS.

The image in my head of flower deliveries is and always has been of a person actually carrying the beautiful vase overflowing with just the right arrangement to the door of a very surprised recipient. I never envisioned a UPS truck pulling up, honking, dropping off the box, and driving off.

So, I decided to inquire about the situation. I noticed a handy “chat” box in the corner. When I clicked on it, the instructions said to enter my question and an agent would be right with me. I entered “I have a question about delivery.” The response came fairly quickly.

The response was … wait for it …

Yes

Seriously, that was the “customer service” representative’s response to my question.

Yes

No punctuation. No addition of “Yes, of course. I can help you with that.”

Naturally, I had to ask her (given what I do) if that was the way she was trained to respond to a customer. Her response then was the expected scripted answer that I should have received at the beginning. We went back and forth a couple of times with me stating my shock at such rude responses and her continuing to give me her script, basically ignoring my comments.

Finally, I said I would rather do business with another company that knows how to communicate with its customers. Her response to that? Wait for it …

A three-question customer survey:

How you were greeted by our customer support agent

Our response time

The quality of answers provided

There was no apology. There were no parting words, not even the scripted kind, from the representative. Just the survey that popped up in the corner of the chat box.

Anyone want to guess how I rated the “customer support” agent? How often do you think I will use this company in the future?

That $65 probably doesn’t matter much to such a big company, but they lost a potential customer and they inspired that potential customer to spread the word about their “customer service.”

So, how well are you communicating with your customers?

 

Can You Disconnect?

Do you panic when you can’t find your cell phone? Do you hyperventilate when you realize you left it at home as you drive away to a meeting or even just to the grocery store?

 

If you’re old(er) like me (!!!), you remember when the phone stayed connected to the wall, usually in the kitchen. Now we are connected to the phone and, it seems, can’t survive without it.

 

What would happen if you put your phone down and walked away for 10 minutes? 30 minutes? A couple of hours?

 

Would you be afraid of missing text messages, emails, or social media posts?

 

Or would you discover a new way to communicate? Yes, children, there is a communication method that doesn’t involve an electronic device. It’s called … wait for it … conversation!

 

Try an experiment. See how long you can NOT touch or look at or even think about your cell phone. At first it may be a bit stressful, but after a while you may actually find that you are less stressed.

 

Hyperconnectivity can actually increase your stress level. Ever hear of a condition called FOMO? It’s the fear of missing out. The more you are on social media, for example, the more you worry about missing a post or a tweet or a chat. Believe it or not, sometimes those things can go on without you!

 

So put it down. Look up. Look into the eyes of the people in the room with you. Oh wait. First, you have to ask them to put down their cell phones!

 

Have a conversation. Watch body language, listen to intonation, and enjoy the human interaction.

 

You can do it!

 

Let me know how it goes.

 

Can cell phone courtesy morph into human communications?

You there, with the cell phone in your hand, you know who you are. You’re probably even reading this on that electronic device. Just so you know, July is Cell Phone Courtesy Month. Finish reading this, of course, but then show some courtesy and put it down!

 

Go find a real human and have a real conversation. You probably won’t have to look far. There might even be other humans right there in the room with you. Yeah, they have their heads buried in their cell phones too!

 

For the “older” people, GenXers and Boomers, this is not just a case of “kids today.” There was a time when we marveled at the young people sitting right next to each other, texting each other instead of engaging in actual human conversation, but the trend has definitely expanded to all generations.

 

Look around the conference room, the board room, even the meeting of two people across a desk, and you will find cell phones galore. Is anyone really paying attention to that presentation on the big screen? Probably not. They’re kind of busy with their own small screens.

 

So, back to Cell Phone Courtesy Month. The most courteous thing to do when in the presence of other human beings is to ditch the electronic device, at least while real people would like your actual attention. This, of course, is not Give Up Your Cell Phone Addiction Month. We’d just like a little courtesy.

 

If you don’t think it’s such a big deal, try looking around the next time you are in a restaurant, in a business meeting, or even walking in a park. What do you see? The tops of people’s heads, right? Their faces are buried in their virtual world and they are totally ignoring the real humans in their immediate space.

 

You might be pleasantly surprised when you try having a real conversation with a real human. There are no emojis involved, but you do get the pleasure of looking into a pair of real eyes and watching real body language as you talk. That’s a pretty cool new invention, don’t you think?

 

Put down the electronic device. Look up. Show some courtesy. Try it for a month. You might find you like it enough to form a new habit – human communications.

 

 

Does your team need help learning how to communicate with humans again? Email me at pat@words-working.net.

 

 

Are you using your words for good?

“We can each take the time to think about the words we are posting, to think about the real humans that will see and be affected by those words, before we hit the magical button that sends our words out into the world.”

 

Check out my Op-Ed piece, published in the News & Observer:

 

http://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article153261469.html

 

 

Human communication means business

Everyone has a customer service story.

 

Everyone has a workplace communication story.

 

Everyone usually tells these stories in a negative light.

 

What can we do to change the stories to improve the business environment?

 

Very simply, we can remember that we are communicating with humans.

 

Technology has distracted us from the reality of doing business with real people. Or maybe we have become resentful that real people are distracting us from our technology?

 

We have become so dependent on electronic communication – texts, emails, tweets, and other forms of electronic, ephemeral messaging – that we forget there is an actual human on the other end.

 

We lose touch with the fact that our words impact others (and may actually have a longer shelf life than we intended). Maybe we even lose the ability to speak in person with another human being.

 

Let’s change those negative stories by temporarily putting down the cell phone, the tablet, or any other electronic device that we think we cannot live without – and having a real conversation with a real person.

 

When speaking with your customers, look them in the eye and watch their body language. Listen to their words. Respond to what they are saying to you. Your customers are not emojis or hash tags. They are real people who need a real person to listen and respond to their questions and needs.

 

Show clients some personalized appreciation by handwriting a thank you note and sending it in the real-life mail. How many people do that? You will impress your client not only by acknowledging them but by doing so in a way that is unique and special in today’s business environment.

 

When speaking with co-workers and employees, think about what kind of information they need to do their jobs, to further their careers, to improve the success of the business. They are not just names on an email distribution list. They are real humans, working to help your business grow.

 

It’s all quite simple. We change the tone of the story by changing the mode of the communication, as often as possible.

 

Your team members are humans. Your customers are humans. Use your human communication skills to make those stories positive again and improve your business environment!

 

Pat Fontana works with businesses to help your team members remember how to communicate as humans!

Business secret: Communicate often – and well

I didn’t know.

My manager didn’t tell me.

That’s the first I’ve heard of it.

That clerk was so rude. I’m never going back there again.

Those people don’t seem to talk to each other.

Sound familiar? Are people saying this in or about your business?

Communications can help or hurt your business. Poor – or no – communications actually can cost your business. Communications with customers are especially crucial, but even internal communications can significantly impact your business success.

Let’s start with the last couple of comments above. What are your customers / clients saying about your team members? Do you have a rude employee? Do you have employees who clearly want to be somewhere else, in the midst of a customer transaction?

I’ve seen fast food employees checking their cell phones as they were taking orders from customers. I’ve been on the receiving end of a very rude company representative who was obviously ready to go home when I expected a certain level of customer service toward the end of his work day. I’ve always had extremely pleasant exchanges with a clerk in a grocery store. Guess which business I will recommend to others and return to myself on a regular basis?

Internally, your employees may be repeating the first three comments above. Managers have their meetings and then go about their business without sharing vital information with their team. Individuals working on a project find it easier just to do the work alone, rather than involve co-workers. Front-line employees don’t get the information that is decided behind closed management doors.

I’ve worked in a corporate environment that was so stressful, we were standing in line hoping for our turn when the layoffs started. Most of the stress was caused by communication issues. There was virtually no downstream communication. Mistakes were made because people did not have the right information or, in some cases, any information.

Your secret to business success? Communicate with your customers / clients. Communicate internally. Do it often. Do it well. Misinterpretation can be just as harmful as no communication.

Write your emails so they are clearly understood, without a long chain of follow-up messages. Make a phone call to discuss things. Make meetings meaningful by providing actual information and answering questions.

Of course it will take some effort. If it were easy, everybody would be doing it!

Train your team members to understand what your customers / clients need to know and to learn how to provide that information to them on a regular basis.

Train your managers to consider what their team members need to know and to learn how to provide that information to them on a regular basis.

Communication can hurt or help your business. Clear, regular communication can be the secret to your business demise or to your business success.

 

Ready to train your team? Let’s talk.

pat@words-working.net